Top five most romantic movies of all time

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What is your top five list of most romantic movies?

We have gone through the cinema history and compiled the top 5 greatest romantic movies of all time. We are sure that you have watched some of the movies listed below but if you haven’t, it’s time to watch them with your loved ones!

5. A man and a woman

A Man and a Woman (French: Un homme et une femme) is a 1966 French film written and directed by Claude Lelouch and starring Anouk Aimée and Jean-Louis Trintignant. Written by Lelouch and Pierre Uytterhoeven, the film is about a young widow and widower who meet by chance at their children’s boarding school and whose budding relationship is complicated by the memories of their deceased spouses.[2] The film is notable for its lush photography, which features frequent segues between full color, black-and-white, and sepia-toned shots, and for its memorable musical score by Francis Lai.

 

4. One Wonderful Sunday

 

One Wonderful Sunday (素晴らしき日曜日 Subarashiki Nichiyōbi) is a 1947 Japanese film co-written and directed by Akira Kurosawa. It is in black-and-white and runs 108 minutes.

Yuzo and his fiancée, Masako, spend a Sunday together in Tokyo. Between them they have 35 yen and are determined to make it last. The film was made during the Occupation and shows some of the challenges facing post-war Tokyo. It is notable in the Kurosawa canon because Masako breaks the fourth wall near the end of the film.

 

3. In the mood for love

In the Mood for Love is a 2000 Hong Kong film written, produced and directed by Wong Kar-wai. It tells the story of a man (played by Tony Leung) and a woman (Maggie Cheung) whose spouses have an affair together and who slowly develop feelings for each other.

In the Mood for Love premiered on 20 May 2000, at the 2000 Cannes Film Festival where it was nominated for the Palme d’Or and Tony Leung was awarded Best Actor. It is frequently listed as one of the greatest films of the 2000s and one of the major works of Asian cinema.

The movie forms the second part of an informal trilogy: The first part was Days of Being Wild (released in 1990) and the last part was 2046 (released in 2004).

2. Annie Hall

Annie Hall is a 1977 American romantic comedy film directed by Woody Allen from a screenplay he co-wrote with Marshall Brickman. Produced by Allen’s manager, Charles H. Joffe, the film stars the director as Alvy “Max” Singer, who tries to figure out the reasons for the failure of his relationship with the film’s eponymous female lead, played by Diane Keaton in a role written specifically for her.

The Plot  – the comedian Alvy Singer is trying to understand why his relationship with Annie Hall ended a year ago. Growing up in New York, he vexed his mother with impossible questions about the emptiness of existence, but he was precocious about his innocent sexual curiosity.

Annie and Alvy, in a line for The Sorrow and the Pity, overhear another man deriding the work of Federico Fellini and Marshall McLuhan; McLuhan himself steps in at Alvy’s invitation to criticize the man’s comprehension. That night, Annie shows no interest in sex with Alvy. Instead, they discuss his first wife, whose ardor gave him no pleasure. His second marriage was to a New York writer who didn’t like sports and was unable to reach orgasm.

With Annie, it is different. The two of them have fun making a meal of boiled lobster together. He teases her about the unusual men in her past. He met her playing tennis doubles with friends. Following the game, awkward small talk led her to offer him first a ride up town and then a glass of wine on her balcony. There, what seemed a mild exchange of trivial personal data is revealed in “mental subtitles” as an escalating flirtation. Their first date follows Annie’s singing audition for a night club (“It Had to be You”). He suggests they kiss first to get it out of the way. After their lovemaking that night, Alvy is “a wreck”, while she relaxes with a joint.

Soon Annie admits she loves him, while he buys her books on death and says that his feelings for her are more than just love. When she moves in with him, things become very tense. Eventually, he finds her arm in arm with one of her college professors and the two begin to argue whether this is the “flexibility” they had discussed. They eventually break up, and he searches for the truth of relationships, asking strangers on the street about the nature of love, questioning his formative years, and imagining a cartoon version of himself arguing with a cartoon Annie portrayed as the Evil Queen in Snow White.

Alvy returns to dating, but the effort is marred by neurosis, bad sex, and finally an interruption from Annie, who insists he come over immediately. It turns out she needs him to kill a spider. A reconciliation follows, coupled with a vow to stay together come what may. However, their separate discussions with their therapists make it evident there is an unspoken divide. When Alvy accepts an offer to present an award on television, they fly out to Los Angeles, with Alvy’s friend, Rob. However, on the return trip, they agree that their relationship is not working. After losing her to her record producer, Tony Lacey, he unsuccessfully tries rekindling the flame with a marriage proposal. Back in New York, he stages a play of their relationship but changes the ending: now she accepts.

The last meeting for them is a wistful coda on New York’s Upper West Side, when they have both moved on to someone new. Alvy’s voice returns with a summation: love is essential, especially if it is neurotic. Annie sings “Seems Like Old Times” and the credits roll.

 

1. Titanic

This movie needs no introduction as we are pretty sure most of you have watched it. Titanic is a 1997 American epic romance-disaster film directed, written, co-produced and co-edited by James Cameron. A fictionalized account of the sinking of the RMS Titanic, it stars Leonardo DiCaprio and Kate Winslet as members of different social classes who fall in love aboard the ship during its ill-fated maiden voyage.

Cameron’s inspiration for the film came from his fascination with shipwrecks; he felt a love story interspersed with the human loss would be essential to convey the emotional impact of the disaster. Production began in 1995, when Cameron shot footage of the actual Titanic wreck. The modern scenes on the research vessel were shot on board the Akademik Mstislav Keldysh, which Cameron had used as a base when filming the wreck. Scale models, computer-generated imagery, and a reconstruction of the Titanic built at Baja Studios, at Playas de Rosarito in Baja California were used to re-create the sinking. The film was partially funded by Paramount Pictures and 20th Century Fox. It was the most expensive film ever made at the time, with a production budget of USD$200 million.

Content Excepts are from Wikipedia

 

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