Son of late 66-year-old Eason Lee Kun-Cheng accuses his 26-year-old girlfriend of 5 crimes, claims someone forged documents to steal inheritance

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Eason Lee Kun-Cheng (right) and Lin Jing En (left).

28th May 2023 – (Taipei) The Taiwanese music industry mourned the loss of Eason Lee Kun-Cheng, a well-known lyricist who passed away on 8th April at the age of 66, just days after marrying his girlfriend Lin Jing En, who is 40 years his junior. The news of his death was shared on social media by his wife, who revealed that Lee had been hospitalised for the past seven months battling colorectal cancer.

Lee had a successful career spanning several decades and was known for producing popular songs such as Feng Fei Fei’s ‘Xin Gan Bao Bei’ and Lo Ta-yu’s ‘Train’. However, he made headlines back in 2013 when it was revealed that he was dating a friend’s daughter, Lin, who was only 17 years old at the time. The relationship caused a scandal, with Lin’s family suing Lee in court for harming the family’s reputation. However, the family lost the case.

According to Taiwanese media, after Lee was hospitalised, his girlfriend realised that she couldn’t sign off on his documents as they weren’t considered family. The couple then decided to register their marriage so that Lin would be recognised as Lee’s legal spouse.

However, just over a month after Lee’s passing, his son from a previous marriage took to his father’s Facebook account to air his grievances about Lin. In the post, he accused herof taking advantage of his father’s death, and criticized her for not dealing with the family’s inheritance taxes and for occupying their family home. He also alleged that she had taken out all the money from his father’s bank account, sold his car, and vandalized their family home. He claimed that she had even locked the front gate and thrown things around, but luckily, he was able to save the family’s ancestral altar.

The post has since gone viral on social media, with many people expressing their condolences to Lee’s family and criticising the son for airing his grievances on social media. Some have also questioned the authenticity of the post, as it was made on Lee’s Facebook account after his death.