Development Bureau proposes HK$9.5 billion upgrade to stormwater drainage systems

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27th May 2024 – (Hong Kong) The Development Bureau has submitted a comprehensive proposal to the Legislative Council, outlining plans for significant upgrades to stormwater drainage systems across seven districts in Hong Kong. The proposed improvements, with a budget of HK$9.5 billion, aim to address the challenges posed by extreme weather conditions experienced in September of the previous year.

The districts earmarked for the upgrades include Wong Tai Sin, Kwun Tong, Mong Kok, Kowloon City, Eastern Hong Kong Island, Sha Tin, Sai Kung, and Tai Po. These areas experienced severe flooding during the extreme weather events, highlighting the urgent need for enhanced stormwater management infrastructure.

Among the districts, Wong Tai Sin witnessed the most detrimental impact, with longstanding criticism directed at authorities for delays in constructing a crucial underground stormwater storage tank. In response to these concerns, the authorities have now included plans to build a substantial underground tank with a capacity of 47,000 cubic meters at Morse Park. Additionally, the existing drainage system along Po Kong Village Road will undergo rehabilitation as part of the project.

The entire project is expected to be executed in phases over the course of the next five years, with the underground storage tank estimated to be completed within approximately 4.5 years. This ambitious undertaking demonstrates the government’s commitment to mitigating flooding risks and enhancing the resilience of the city’s stormwater management infrastructure.

In light of the unprecedented rainfall experienced last year, the Drainage Services Department has conducted a thorough reassessment of over 140 years of rainfall data obtained from the Observatory. In March, the department updated the design rainfall parameters in its Stormwater Drainage Manual, incorporating the revised information to ensure the new infrastructure is well-equipped to handle future extreme weather events.